Overcoming Rotator Cuff Repair

Many of our clients see us because they want to overcome a rotator cuff tear without surgery.   However, if the injury is severe enough, a surgery may be required to restore functional use of the shoulder.  At Movement Solutions, we specialize helping people who have had rotator cuff sugery get back to activities they love.

At our office, we specialize in helping people in their 40’s-60’s who have had a rotator cuff repair and:

  • want specialized care from the beginning, or
  • tried traditional physical therapy but experienced lackluster results

We get our patients back to activity through a program that includes treatement to alleviate pain, exercises to restore movement, and a plan to get develop strength.  This approach gives us the best opportunity to get our patients back activities like playing with little ones, playing golf, playing tennis, and lifting weights.

When someone comes to us following a rotator cuff repair, we gather information and then design a treatment program based on our clients’ specific needs and goals.

The rehabilitation program is typically be divided into 4 phases:

  • Phase I (maximal protection). Phase 1 of treatment lasts for the first few weeks after your surgery, when the shoulder is at the greatest risk of reinjury. During this phase, the arm will be in a sling.  Assistance will be needed to accomplish everyday tasks, such as bathing and dressing. Our physical therapists will teach gentle range-of-motion and isometric strengthening exercises, provide hands-on treatments (manual therapy), such as gentle massage, provide recommendations to reduce pain.
  • Phase II (moderate protection). This next phase has the goal of restoring mobility to the shoulder.  Time in the sling will be reduced and range-of-motion and strengthening exercises will become more challenging.  Exercises will be added to strengthen the muscles around the shoulder blade and trunk.  This phase allows use of the arm for daily activities, but will still limit heavy lifting.  Our physical therapistists use special hands-on mobilization techniques during this phase to help restore the shoulder’s range of motion.
  • Phase III (return to activity). This phase has the goal of restoring your strength and joint awareness to equal that of the opposite shoulder. At this point, the shoulder should be clear to perform daily activities.  However, sports, yard work, or physically strenuous work-related still need to a plan of progression.  Our physical therapists advance the the rehab program with weight training and more challenging movement patterns. A modified fitness-oriented program may also be started during this phase.
  • Phase IV (return to work/sport). This phase will help you return to work, sports, and other higher-level activities. During guide our clients in activity-specific exercises to meet their needs. This may include drills to help with lifting weights, playing tennis, or playing golf.

When addressed with a well designed rehabilitation plan, returning to activity following rotator cuff repair is possible.  If you have had or are planning to have a rotator cuff surgery, the physical therapists at Movement Solutions would be glad to be a resource for you.

We have a free guide on shoulder health that can give you further insight into shoulder problems and help kickstart your recovery.  We are available for a free 15-minute phone consultation to talk about how your surgery and discuss your treatment options.

If you prefer an in-person consultation, we offer a limited number of free Discovery Visits at our office.  This type of appointment of for those who are interested in working with us.  It is an opportunity to ask questions, obtain clarity about your surgery, and foster confidence in our ability to help you.

If you’re certain that we’re a good fit and ready to book an appointment, you can inquire about cost and availability and get the process started.

If you’re unsure about what your next steps should be, call us at (864) 558-7346 and ask how we can help.

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